Music

Going Blank Again

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There are two interesting pieces on Ride’s second album, Going Blank Again. One is from the latest edition of Uncut, and another is from 2012.

The band’s next album is This is Not a Safe Place, so I think it is fitting to remember what an incredible sophomore album GBA really is. In terms of second records, it’s one of the best there ever was.

Those big moments, though, are defined by the more concise ones around them. The taut ringing of acoustic guitars on “Chrome Waves” or the lean psych-pop of “Making Judy Smile” or the angular riffage of “Time Of Her Time” all let us hear a new side of Ride. It reminded us that Ride may have made pop built firmly for the dreamworld, but the group never forgot the very real rock muscle this sound could generate underneath all that atmosphere. Here, it’s that physicality that comes to the surface and makes Going Blank Again an album that doesn’t have to take up space to be staggering in its sound. Ride didn’t make the mistake of making one huge-sounding album (Nowhere) and trying to top it with more layers, with bigger distortion, with more muddled volume. Instead, Ride peeled things back most of the time on Going Blank Again, so when they did decide to swell into something more atmospheric, those huge moments were earned.

Definitely go for the expanded version of the album and see them playing live. And track down all of the B-sides, too. If there was ever a record that deserved an omnibus or expanded version, this is it.

Fat, Drunk, and Stupid is No Way to Go Through Life, Son

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I was kind of hoping someone would explain things to Lewis Capaldi, but I guess there is no functioning music industry in the whole of England anymore. It’s one thing to act the clown and get people to listen to you because they don’t know if you’re going to collapse in a heap of your own barf, but, Jeez, dude.

You don’t have to demean yourself to get attention.

You don’t have to make yourself the butt of every joke.

You don’t have to put boxes on your limbs and pretend like you don’t have issues.

You can get up in front of people and sing songs and have fun. I think that’s the most reasonable explanation that is available. Let your songs be your calling card. Be friendly and happy if that’s your thing. You don’t have to be savage and moody and you don’t have to be one of those infighting Gallagher brothers.

Does Capaldi have management? Have they given up?