Editorial

The Great Glastonbury Cleanup

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If you care about the environment, and I know I do, then you’ll be pleased to note that they have been able to clean up the site of this year’s Glastonbury Festival in what seems like record time:

[This has been] one of Glastonbry's greenest festivals in years. 

The clean up after Glastonbury Festival 2019 is 90% complete according to organiser Emily Eavis who has described it as a “massive improvement” on the last.

According to The Guardian, this year’s clean-up is expected to be complete in 4 weeks thanks to the continued good weather. In 2017, it looks teams over 6 weeks to complete the clean-up operation.

On Tuesday, Eavis published a post on Instagram saying that this year, “93.3% of all tents were taken home” after analysing the results of an Ariel site photograph before and after the event.

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I’ve yet to figure out how you can abandon a tent, but it makes sense. You spend four or five days throwing up in one, why take it with you?

Millions of Dollars For This?

David Gilmour’s heavily customized “black Strat” guitar recently sold at auction for $3.9 million dollars. I guess it is no different than any other valuable piece of history, but, really, we’re talking about a musical instrument.

This particular guitar spent some time on display in the 1990s at the Hard Rock Cafe in Dallas, Texas. While it was there, various patrons stole pieces from it whenever possible because it wasn’t kept in a glass case. So, virtually all of the components have been swapped out—the fingerboards, the electronics, everything. Nothing on it is original anymore.

Here’s what a 1969 Fender Stratocaster would have cost you back in the day:

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It’s pretty amazing to me that something anyone could have bought for a few hundred dollars would end up being worth so much, especially after being turned into Frankenstein’s monster, but oh well.

The scam that surrounds vintage guitars is alive an well.