CDs

Bombay Bicycle Club

BBC.jpg

I have always maintained a curious interest in Bombay Bicycle Club. Flirting with the oblivion offered by the flu gave me the opportunity to acquire three of their albums/cds/releases in a way that did not bankrupt me, so I am going to give them a proper evaluation.

Bands come and go, and their impact is difficult to gauge. I know that in the 2000s I had a healthy liking for a band called Goldrush, but it would seem that they have disappeared. The rest of the music from that era just passed me by. I never got into the Arctic Monkeys or The Libertines like I probably should have, and everything else from that whole decade just seemed weird. Then there are these albums and I don’t even know when they were made. I think this is a band that straddled the 2000s and 2010s, from what I see on the labels, but who knows anymore?

I always give the new stuff a chance. There aren’t enough great bands! You have to keep searching for new music. I know, I’m an idiot. But I have new music to listen to, so I can’t be all bad.

The Replacements Tim Covers

The Tim album by the Replacements is pretty much the apex of the band--the high point that happened at exactly the moment when they were recorded about as poorly as possible while making the best music of their lives. If this album sounds bad, that's because it does. Tommy Erdelyi was a terrible choice for a producer and the fact that Tim sounds worse than Hootenanny is, well, one more thing to bitch about.

It was the end of the Bob Stinson era and the beginning of the corporate sell-out era, but the drinking and the shenanigans would continue well on through to the end. The songs would never be as good.

The real crowning glory of this era of the band is found on two of the cuts contained on this album. Bastards of Young and Here Comes a Regular are two sides of the same broken heart, and you could build the quintessential novel of the Eighties around those two songs, weaving them in and out of whatever plot full of fuckups and failed glory you could imagine. There are brilliant songs scattered throughout their career, but these two are the two best songs they ever did.

I have never been able to figure out the cover, though. It has an industrial feel to it, with the band portraits designed to make them indie darlings. There were ideas behind it, but how do they match up to the words "a picture on a fridge that's never stocked with food?" And why didn't someone just put that image on the front and call it a day?