Showing posts with label Sports Media. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sports Media. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

ESPN Will No Longer Offend Racists and Donald Trump




If you were worried that your favorite athlete was going to say something bad about the racist horrorshow we are currently living through, don't worry. ESPN is carefully examining how best to avoid offending white supremacists all over the country:

“We want to emphasize a direct connection to sports, understanding that’s the lens through which most fans view ESPN,” he said. “We also understand there may occasionally be exceptions that reference important, broader political topics. We just want to ensure those are thoughtful discussions, and meet the other criteria in the guidelines.”

Said Bengtson: “I don’t think people are turning us on to hear us talk about social and political issues. When we can make a connection with sports, we should do so and do it smartly.”

“The presentation should be thoughtful and respectful. We should offer balance or recognize opposing views, as warranted. We should avoid personal attacks and inflammatory rhetoric.”

I don't know how you would find "balance" when the President of the United States is surrounded by Nazis and white supremacists. Maybe you'd find it somewhere else where people actually perform the age-old practice of journalism.

Basically, ESPN is telling everyone that their coverage will be a "safe zone" where political commentary will never intrude upon the gentle thought process of those who are tired of seeing professional athletes stand up for social causes. This goes against every aspect of common sense, given the fact that athletes in this country are rediscovering the power of being politically active in their communities.

You can expect that incidents like this will be excised from ESPN's coverage:

It was a somber moment before the Minnesota Lynx WNBA team took the court on Saturday night. Four players, standing in front of the press before the game started, wore black shirts that on the front said, “Change starts with us, justice and accountability”; on the back were the names Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, the crest of the Dallas Police Department, and the words “Black Lives Matter.”

“If we take this time to see that this is a human issue and speak out together, we can greatly decrease fear and create change,” said Maya Moore, one of the team captains and the 2014 league MVP. “Tonight we will be wearing shirts to honor and mourn the losses of precious American citizens and to plead for change in all of us.”

Moore said they wanted to speak out against racial profiling that many activists said led to the death of Sterling, who was shot in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Castile, who was shot last week by a police officer in suburban St. Paul, not far from where the Lynx were playing in Minneapolis. Moore also denounced the “senseless ambush” of Dallas police when five officers were killed by a lone gunman.

ESPN would certainly not want to offend anyone who advocates for the killing of unarmed black people, you see. They have feelings, too. They're going for the Donald Trump demographic--people who want to live out their white supremacist fantasies while watching terrible sports programming that is free of any reminder that they're an asshole.

Failing to take a stand for basic human decency in order to make money by not offending horrible people is cowardice, plain and simple.  If this isn't the absolute low point of low points in the history of ESPN, then what is? 













Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Sport by Victoria


Is she qualified? Who the hell cares? It's cold, and winter sports are king for me. As soon as I figure out what's going on, I'll try to figure out if she makes any sense or not.


Victoria Silvstedt

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

When The Money Stops, the Hookers Do Tend to Give Up Your Secrets

Nah, Keep Digging, Sir...


Am I reading this wrong?



Despite claims that Tiger Woods was cheap when it came to spending money on the women with whom he had relationships, some did benefit financially and continue to do so.


According to several women who were involved with the golfer, Woods wired money to them on a monthly basis. The dollar amounts they cite range from $5,000 to $10,000 per month, and there’s talk among those women that someone out there might be getting as much as $20,000 per month.


“The money comes via a wire transfer,” said one woman. “There’s no contract about it, there’s no discussion about what it’s for, but it’s implied that it’s in exchange for keeping quiet about his affair.”


According to that same woman, Woods continued to be in touch in the days following his Thanksgiving night car accident. “Elin took his cell phone away, so he had to call from his land line at home,” said one. “He hasn’t called in at least a week though.”



Of course, Tiger gets all of that money back from his whores, now that they've gone on talk shows and all that, correct?


Oh, wait. There was no contract. So, unlike the huge losses that Tiger now has to suffer because Accenture, Gillette, and a growing number of advertisers have cancelled his contractstheir with him, Tiger doesn't get his whoring around money back from the flopsy butter hogs and the anal porn stars and the hillbilly trailer trash he was banging. And I say that as a man who has nothing against whores. I love whores. I'm not a former billionaire who made bank presenting myself as an elite athlete and an establishment darling, however. Has Jim Brown reached out to Tiger yet? Can't wait for that debacle.


That's how that works, right? Sometimes, I'm so naive about these things. I really need to do more whoring around.

Monday, November 30, 2009

Tiger Woods is Screwed



This is my prediction for what the jokes are going to sound like--this is not what I actually think, it's just an idea:

Tiger Woods is about to find out what it's like to live like a black man in America.

The law is closing in on him, his wife just tried to kill him, and now the crazy bitch he was screwing just got a lawyer.


Granted, that's racist as hell, and I'm sorry I wrote it, but I had to write it, because it will be coming out of the mouths of every black comic in America who has had it up to here with how Tiger Woods has gotten a pass. He's gotten away with it, and now, the walls are closing in:



The Florida Highway Patrol is seeking a search warrant for hospital records that would document the treatment Tiger Woods received after an auto accident early Friday morning, TMZ.com has reported, citing unnamed sources.

The Florida state police, according to the Web site's report, want to determine if the injuries Woods sustained resembled those from an auto accident or domestic violence.

Woods, who was scheduled to compete at his Chevron World Challenge that starts Thursday in Thousand Oaks, Calif., will not attend or play because of injuries sustained in the incident, he announced Monday on his Web site.

Headaches and soreness will keep Woods from traveling to attend the tournament, The Golf Channel reported.

"I am extremely disappointed that I will not be at my tournament this week," Woods said on TigerWoods.com. "I am certain it will be an outstanding event and I'm very sorry that I can't be there."

When contacted Monday by ESPN, Florida Highway Patrol spokeswoman Kim Miller said the FHP has made no statements to anyone regarding Woods and warrants.

But according to the TMZ.com report, the state police think they can show probable cause of a crime committed during the events that unfolded Friday.

There may not have been a crime committed, but there was a whole lot of favoritism granted on account of where Woods lived (the rich part of town) and what he got away with (imagine someone being able to turn away the police, three days in a row, from their home).

I think that the African-American community has a chance to speak to this double standard in how Woods has been treated better than anyone in America. My point is that, sometimes, not even money can keep certain African-Americans from being treated unfairly by the police. Sometimes, you also have to live in the right part of town and be Tiger Woods in order to get away with having the same troubles all of us have.

Whatever the truth is here, we haven't gotten the truth out of Tiger yet. This is the worst possible example of mishandling public relations I have ever witnessed.

Here's what I've had to say on my main blog, here, here, and here.

Saturday, November 28, 2009

What Happened Here?

The Buick Enclave, which was NOT the vehicle the Tiger Woods was driving when he crashed


Negligent, impaired, or just plain confused?



Tiger Woods was seriously injured early Friday when he hit a fire hydrant and a tree near his Florida home, authorities said.


The Florida Highway Patrol said the PGA star hit the fire hydrant and tree as he pulled out of his driveway in his 2009 Cadillac sport utility vehicle.


Mr. Woods was taken to Health Central Hospital. Officials there didn't have record of him as a patient, though the news release said Mr. Woods' injuries were serious.


The highway patrol said the crash is still under investigation, and charges are pending. However, the highway patrol said the crash was not alcohol-related.


Mr. Woods, 33 years old, owns a home in the exclusive subdivision of Isleworth near Orlando. Orange County property records indicate his home is valued at $2.4 million.



Woods was driving a Cadillac--and yet, he's the spokesperson for the Buick Enclave, pictured above. I would say that the pending charges are for negligent driving or driving while impaired in some way.

Pain killers? Is it wrong to suggest that Woods may have been under the influence of a pain killer of some type? Given his history of being injured, is that outside of the realm of possibility?

Sunday, November 22, 2009

Missing the Glory Days of Golf

Warwick Hills, 17th Hole


Tough times for the economy mean tough times for golf courses:



The recession has dealt a mean bogey to golf. Hundreds of courses have closed in the last two years and many formerly exclusive country clubs have slashed fees or opened their greens to the public.

Sales of golf balls, clubs and apparel -- a multibillion-dollar industry -- have dipped 10% this year as players trim spending, according to golf researcher Pellucid Corp.

But perhaps the most dramatic examples of golf's woes can be seen in the string of barren fairways and locked gates. Through September of this year, at least 114 of the nation's 16,000 or so golf courses had closed, according to the National Golf Foundation, a number that was offset only partly by the opening of 44 new courses.

"People are cutting golf out of their diets because they've got to cut something," said Jeff Woolson, a real estate broker with Los Angeles-based CB Richard Ellis who specializes in buying and selling golf courses.

Woolson and other real estate experts say most golf courses have lost 30% to 50% of their worth in the last two years. Several courses have been forced into bankruptcy. Among them is Chevy Chase Country Club in Glendale, which dates to 1925 and was designed by noted golf architect William P. Bell, who also designed the Bel Air Country Club and the Newport Beach Country Club.

The owners tried to sell it for $6.5 million, but couldn't find a buyer before the bankruptcy court decided to turn it over to the lender. The asking price, which would have included a Spanish-style clubhouse and Olympic-sized pool on 35 acres, might sound like a bargain -- there are homes in the Los Angeles area that sell for more -- but golf courses are businesses, not typical real estate investments, because they must remain golf courses. And business has been bad lately.

It's a big comedown from the glory days.

Golf thrived so in the 1980s that it was widely believed that a new U.S. course could open every day and there still wouldn't be enough links to satisfy demand. In the 1990s came Tiger Woods, who made the world pay attention to golf as he grew to dominate the sport. The "Tiger effect," many investors assumed, would launch a youth wave of interest in the sport.



The Tiger effect really didn't happen. Just because a lot of people began to pay attention to golf, that didn't necessarily translate into people taking up the sport. I'm sure that a few tried it, but rarely did you see anyone stick with the sport once they figured out just how difficult it was.


The glory days happened because people had money and leisure time. Working for the Man nowadays means no time off, screaming brats on the weekend, and barely enough money to not pay the mortgage. The increase in the number of people wearing nametags and working for peanuts has meant that there are fewer and fewer bankers and financial services people to play golf.

Saturday, November 14, 2009

Golf and a Man Bear Pig

Sign, Camp Bonifas, South Korea


Here's a story about our troops that doesn't involve horrible news and tragedy. This is exactly the sort of thing I enjoy reading about, and learning about. I'm afraid I can't do horror and screaming and what the hell is our government doing? posts all of the time. Most of the time, sure. I have brass balls in that regard. But, once in a while, I have to get off that bus and stretch my legs.


In South Korea, our troops have many, many golf courses. One, in particular, stands out:



You stand atop an elevated tee box on the first and only hole of the world's most dangerous golf course.

And you consider your chances.

This deadly little par 3 measures 192 yards but plays more like 250 in the face of the vicious winds that often blow out of North Korea across an exclusive piece of real estate called the DMZ just a few yards away.

Underneath your feet and off to the right are bunkers. The military kind. To the left, over an 18-foot-high security fence topped by concertina wire, are hazards that make high rough, deep water and dense woods seem like child's play.

Try countless unexploded mines -- the very definition of out-of-bounds. One herky-jerky backswing, one snap hook yanked out of your bag at the wrong moment and . . . ba-boom!



The soldiers would like Tiger Woods to play the course, and there's no reason why he shouldn't. It would be a great Public Relations move. I've seen some nutty things on the golf course, but this is a bit much:



Over the years, the course has developed its own mystique. Play alone here and you'll see. Weird things happen.


"You see animals," [Army Sgt. Mikel] Thurman says.

Like wild boars, Korean tigers and so-called vampire deer.

And even something weirder.

"Some guys say they've seen this thing, a man-bear-pig," Thurman says without smiling. "That's what they say."



Well, there is no man-bear-pig. There are men who don't shave, and there are men with pig faces, but unless someone has been dabbling in the realm of cloning and dogs and...and...



Research by South Korea's top human cloning scientist  [he announced in August, 2005 that his team had created the world's first cloned dog]- hailed as a breakthrough earlier this year - was fabricated, colleagues have concluded.


A Seoul National University panel said the research by world-renowned Hwang Woo-suk was "intentionally fabricated", and he would be disciplined.


Dr Hwang said he would resign, but he did not admit his research was faked.


"I sincerely apologise to the people for creating shock and disappointment," he said after the panel's announcement.


"As a symbol of apology, I step down as professor of Seoul National University."




Never mind.

Monday, October 5, 2009

The Erin Andrews Stalker Has Been Captured


Michael David Barrett is the man accused of being the stalker who surreptitiously taped ESPN sportscaster Erin Andrews in her hotel room. Today, we get a good look at what a real dirtbag looks like:



An insurance executive accused of secretly making nude videos of ESPN reporter Erin Andrews apparently uploaded videos of other unsuspecting nude women to the Internet, a federal prosecutor said Monday.


Michael D. Barrett, 47, was ordered released on $4,500 bond but was ordered to wear an ankle monitoring bracelet, to adhere to a strict curfew and not to use the Internet. He is due in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Oct. 23 to face federal charges of Interstate stalking. Barrett is accused of trying to sell the videos to Los Angeles-based celebrity gossip site TMZ.


Barrett continues to be a danger to Andrews and "a danger to other women," Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Grimes told U.S. Magistrate Judge Arlander Keys during Barrett's bond hearing Monday.


"Yes, Judge, there are other women," Grimes said. "He has used his computer to disseminate these videos to the world."


Grimes said the government has confiscated two computers and cell phones used by Barrett, and "feels strongly that those items will provide further evidence."


Like the Andrews videos, the videos of the other women were shot through a door peephole and uploaded to the Internet under a name Barrett used, "GOBLAZERS1," Grimes said.


Andrews appears in at least eight videos nude. An FBI affidavit said Barrett specifically asked for a room next to Andrews at a Tennessee hotel where seven videos were likely taken, apparently through an altered peephole. An eighth video may have been shot at a Milwaukee hotel.


Barrett was described by his attorney, Rick Beuke, as having plenty of money and a good track record at work. Beuke said his employer, the Combined Insurance Co., based in Glenview, where he is in insurance sales, is "very supportive."


Beuke told reporters after court that Barrett has many friends and that the person described in an FBI affidavit released Saturday "is certainly not the Mike Barrett that any of us know." He said he had spoken with Barrett's parents, who live near Portland, Ore., and "this is a tough time for them."



He had a fairly sophisticated operation going, and went so far as to modify the peephole for the hotel room with a hacksaw. Barrett crossed a line that needs to be reinforced from time to time. Being no stranger to having a love of beautiful women, I have to reiterate that this was a creepy invasion of privacy and a deviant act. There was nothing admiring about what he did--he is a criminal and he should be sent to prison. I have to admit that it does bother me to have my "safe for work hotties" gallery and to write about something like this.


Clearly, I cannot, nor would I, post something taken against someone's will, and I would certainly remove anything offensive, unless it humiliated a politician in such a way as to remind us all why we hold them in contempt or unless it was clearly taken in public, such as this shot of Kate Gosselin, which comes right up to the same line defined here.

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Of course they're listening in



It's really not that difficult to intercept wireless signals--any idiot can learn how to do it. One of my favorite things in the world is to sit with all three of my police scanners on the back porch and adjust frequencies in order to pick up as much information as I can:
Integrity of the game dialogue often focuses on player conduct. But several NFL coaches and executives enter the 2009 season with wider inspection practices and more paranoid eyes.

Growing, probing technology is causing some in the league to consider if cheating is reaching unprecedented sophistication. They are on guard. They are insistent that NFL leadership be as vigilant.

This goes beyond old-school and novel concerns. They know that some teams hire personnel to scour the hotel rooms of visiting teams' coaches and players and postgame locker rooms in search of any scrap of game-planning that can be pilfered -- They can beat that. It has little to do with opponents continuously seeking ways to survey sideline coaches in hopes of cracking their signals and intended personnel groupings -- They can outsmart them there.

Even familiar charges of artificial crowd noise pumped into stadiums are relatively tame compared with the type of cheating that new technology can provide. So, too, are fresher concerns that some teams are focusing cameras on quarterbacks during his calls at the line of scrimmage, playing the images on jumbo, in-stadium screens, and seeking an advantage for the defense whether instant or later after analysis.

How about home teams showing replays of controversial calls instantly and repeatedly when they work to their advantage -- and never showing them when they do not?

None of this alarms NFL coaches and executives as much as this issue: Are communications involving coaches' headsets and those involving players' in-helmet radios being intercepted by opposing teams?

Some coaches and executives say they have heard enough cracking sounds, enough interference, enough odd feedback and experienced enough times when the technology simply did not work that they believe this issue is a paramount one that must constantly be examined in the 2009 season and beyond.

Static or interference really is not an indicator of being eavesdropped upon. Intercepting a wireless signal transmission from point A to point B isn't going to interfere with the signal unless active jamming is taking place.

Here are the basics:
Home intercom systems. Baby monitors, children's walkie-talkies and some home intercom systems may be overheard in the vicinity of the home in the same manner as cordless phones. Many operate on common radio frequencies that can be picked up by radio scanners, cordless phones, and other baby monitors nearby. If you are concerned about being overheard on one of these devices, turn it off when it is not in use. Consider purchasing a "wired" unit instead.

Speakerphones. If your standard wired phone has the speakerphone feature, be aware that some models may emit weak radio signals from the microphone even when the phone's handset is on-hook, (that is, hung-up, inactive). For short distances, a sensitive receiver may be able to pick up room noise in the vicinity of the speakerphone.

Wireless microphones. Radio scanners can intercept wireless microphones used at conferences, in churches, by entertainers, sports referees, and others. Fast-food employees at drive-through restaurants use wireless systems to transmit order information. Their communications can also be received by scanners in the vicinity. Scanners can also pick up conversations on some walkie-talkies.

Wireless cameras. Wireless videocameras have been installed in thousands of homes and businesses in recent years. The camera sends a signal to a receiver so it can be viewed on a computer or TV. These systems are advertised as home security systems, but they are far from secure. While they are inexpensive and relatively easy to install, they are also easy to monitor by voyeurs nearby who are using the same devices.

Images can be picked up as far as 300 yards from the source, depending on the strength of the signal and the sensitivity of the receiver. Before purchasing a wireless videocamera system, ask yourself if you want to be vulnerable to electronic peeping toms. Research the security features of such systems thoroughly. You might want to wait until the marketplace provides wireless video systems with stronger security features at an affordable price.

Air-to-ground phone services. Conversations on the phone services offered on commercial airlines are easily intercepted by standard radio scanners. They are a favorite target of hobbyists.

Essentially, all you need to know is the frequency that the helmet devices work on, and then you need to have someone monitor that frequency with a scanner. Attach it to a laptop, and you can then pull in the signal and decode it, if necessary, or even make audio files and retain it.

I own several police scanners, the kind that scan EDACS and trunked radio networks. I can sit at home and listen in as camera men, producers, and local television staff sit in their trucks throughout the Washington D.C. area and chat about things. I can listen to virtually anything, and I have a 75-foot antenna wired up at the home in order to help me pull in signals. The Washington D.C. area is a hotbed of signal activity, and your uncle Norman loves to write things down and keep records. All of it perfectly legal, of course.

I'll have to acquire NFL tickets, should we end up near a stadium this season. I'll take my handheld scanner and see if I can pick up some signal calling.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

What Happens When the Cheering Stops?




I'm not sure where this series is going, but this is a kick in the pants:

At least once every few days, someone walks into Findlay Toyota in Henderson, Nev., spots the 6-foot-8 car salesman with the familiar face and wonders, "Is that Ed O'Bannon, the former UCLA star and NBA flameout?" Yes, it is.


Ouch! How'd you like your pals to read that back to you over the phone?

Anyway, the Washington Post is doing a series on "These Athletes Retired as Multimillionaires, But Has Money Bought Them Happiness?" and it goes into the struggles and choices of some familiar names and faces.

Here's an excerpt from the piece about Bret Boone:

Bret Boone's 2008 comeback attempt with the Washington Nationals, after two full seasons out of the game, may have been born into a world of wealth and tranquillity -- a world made possible by a total of nearly $50 million he earned in his career -- but it was spawned from darkness. From the descent into the hell of alcoholism and the climb back out. From primal urges -- conquering demons, proving something to oneself, gaining closure.

If the athlete's playing career is life, and retirement is death, Boone -- or at least the ghost of him that showed up in 2008 -- refused to go into that good night until his career was given a proper burial.

"I struggled for that 18-month period where I was just kind of lost," Boone, now 40, says. "Your whole life, [baseball] is . . . not exactly what defines you -- but it's all I've done my whole life. You're Bret Boone, the second baseman, and all of a sudden you're not that guy anymore."

In all but a few pockets of the country that still cared about Bret Boone, the news went by in barely noticed flashes on a television screen or small headlines in a newspaper, stretched across a time frame that, in the mind's eye, could have been weeks or years: March 2006 -- Bret Boone Retires. February 2008 -- Bret Boone Making Comeback. April 2008 -- Bret Boone Retires Again.

But when it's your life and your career, it can consume you. The comeback lasted all of two months, encompassing one final spring training in Viera, Fla., and exactly 13 games in Columbus, Ohio, at the time the home of the Nationals' Class AAA affiliate, where Boone found the answers he sought and buried his career the proper way -- with dignity and finality.

"I had some closure," he says of that spring, when he hit .261 and played passable defense at second base for the Columbus Clippers, but walked away before the Nationals could call him up. "I could still play. I wasn't going to be what I used to be, but I could compete. I knew where I was. And I was okay with it."

It's interesting to consider the wealth being a fixed number, and then thinking of it as a lump sum paid to the players. That's, of course, not the case at all. This is money they were paid, and then everyone came for their cut, and they probably spent a good share of it thinking another bigger payday was around the corner.

Seven million dollars sounds like a lot of money, but when you get past buying three Bentleys for your moms--one for church, one for the store, one for going to the beauty parlor--it adds up quickly. I don't know if anyone has ever had to buy 3 Bentleys for their mother, but I can assure you, it's a pain in the neck to find a dealer with three identical ones on the lot.

UPDATE: Go check out annetteffect.com for more information on coping with post-sports issues.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Crossing the Line With the Erin Andrews Video

Erin Andrews, ESPN



There are some women that I won't put on my blog. That is not to say that I don't like them, that I don't appreciate them, but rather, it is to say that there are some women who we already know are hotties, but perhaps are a little more than just hotties. Is it wrong of me to make that distinction? Is it wrong of me to say, no, I won't put up pictures of Maria Sharapova or Danica Patrick. (Did I do Danica Patrick? Neither Peej nor I can remember.) I suppose I need to address the ethical concerns of posting pictures of hotties, which I do here and here.

Now, I use that term out of fun. In reality, I am a man with a daughter, with fantastic relationships with strong females, and with seriously co-dependent relationships with other females, and I celebrate beauty, not possession of that beauty.

In other words, I do respect women. That may be hard to believe, but I do.

Erin Andrews is in that overall category of women whom I respect and admire--and that's primarily because she doesn't do the "lad magazines" and she is more of a television personality than a mere babe on television.


Being a baseball fan, I have watched Andrews for years, and she is an excellent broadcaster. In and of her own right, she is to be respected, so nothing about this is even remotely right:



Hackers are using an illegally-taped peephole video that has naked shots of glamorous ESPN sports reporter Erin Andrews as a lure to get click-happy web surfers to download dangerous malware to their computers, according to a computer security website.

Andrews has become a popular fixture on ESPN and the web as a vivacious and beautiful reporter. So much so, that someone used a peephole camera to record video of Andrews as she disrobed.

Naturally, the video went viral online and ESPN lawyers have been scrambling to shut down websites that post links to the material.

That means it's getting increasingly hard to find on the web, but that hasn't stopped the growing demand for it.

And it's that drive that hackers are plugging into, according to sophos.com, a website that sells security software, but also provides security news.

One version of the hack, fools surfers into clicking on what appears to be a CNN version of the video, according to Sophos. When users hit the play button they are presented with a pop up window warning them that their popup blocker has blocked the video player window and they must launch another player. Doing so doesn't play the video, but it does install a Trojan horse with which hackers can later attack the computer, says the site.



The person or persons who used the pinhole camera to make the video of Andrews went so far over the line as to obliterate it completely. There is no good reason to do that to any person, male or female, young or old, attractive or not.


I have a policy that says that, should I be contacted by someone and asked to remove photographs or an entire post, I will certainly do so without carping or complaining. In fact, I have always recognized that there is a good chance of that, and that's why I always celebrate and complement, and I save the humiliating and scorning for politicians and liberals. There is a happy medium, and you can celebrate art and beauty, and you can pay someone like Andrews a complement or point out that, wow, she is an attractive young lady, without breaking the law or going so far over the line as to be insanely creepy. And I know insanely creepy, sir.


That being said, I hope they catch whoever did this to Andrews and throw the book at them.