Architecture

Half-hip Pony Truss

Dumbass.jpg

Dumbass:

A historic bridge in North Dakota, built in 1906, collapsed Monday after a tractor-trailer hauling beans and exceeding the weight limit drove over it, the Grand Forks County Sheriff's Office said in a statement.

The bridge, which is on the National Registrar of Historic Places, spans the Goose River and is rated for 14 tons of gross weight, which is marked on the structure, according to the sherrif's office. The weight of the big rig was just over 43 tons, or 86,750 pounds, the sheriff's office said.

Officials estimate it will cost between $800,000 and $1 million to replace the bridge.

The driver of the 2005 Peterbilt truck was identified as Michael Dodds, and he was not injured. An overload citation of $11,400 was issued, the sheriff's office said in a statement.

The bridge type? Well, it was a half-hip pony truss, of course! Of course! And Pratt made it, I guess.

I had no idea that was even a thing. Is it infrastructure week? Because we certainly need an infrastructure week, and soon.

The Throng Below the Eiffel Tower

This is still one of my favorite photos.

In my opinion, the Eiffel Tower is plenty high enough. This was taken looking down from the first platform. At this time of the year, which was roughly November of 2011, there was a skating rink and some food vendors on that level. We then went up to the second platform. You would think, oh, that's not very high and of course, you have to go to the top.

Nope.

If you go up to the second platform, that's plenty high enough. You do not need to go to the top. I did not go to the top. Oh, hell no.

Auldbrass




Joel Silver has saved something remarkable, and it is called Auldbrass.

With the aid of documents from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives, the Avery Architectural Library of Columbia University, and other sources, and with the help of contractors and descendants of people who had worked and lived on the site, Silver aimed to not only restore Wright's vision but complete it.

Auldbrass is the Southern Plantation designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It was allowed to fall into disrepair and it has now taken Hollywood producer Joel Silver 30 years to fully restore.

What I find interesting about Wright's project is that he didn't just build the house--he designed the furniture that went with it. Those pieces have been restored or replaced to specification as well. And Wright was motivated by one purpose--to design a plantation that would run counter to the architectural domination of previous designs and build something that did not command obedience or fear.

Tearing Down Ray Bradbury's Home

Ray Bradbury House, LA Times

Well, this is sad.

Author Ray Bradbury (he was more than just a "sci-fi" writer), lived in the same California home for fifty years before he passed away in 2012. Efforts to save and preserve his real legacy--his papers and whatnot--have been successful. Sometimes, you don't get a chance to save things like that, but Bradbury was prominent enough for this to happen.

His house, however, wasn't worth keeping:
The home, which was purchased in June for $1.765 million, is being demolished. A permit for demolition was issued Dec. 30, Curbed LAreports, and a fan who visited the house over the weekend found it in the process of being torn down.
A home built in 1937 isn't that old, especially if it has been remodeled or upgraded since then. The value of the lot was, apparently, more than that of the house. Whatever they put there will be a separate and distinct property. I don't fault the nostalgia for an old writer's house, but his printed works and accomplishments are worth more than the built-in bookshelves that held them.

Whose Ordered Plan?


The British say this is a work of madness:
An eccentric architectural plan thought to have been drawn by George III during his period of "madness" has been discovered at the British Library.
It is part of a huge collection of papers put together by the King during his reign from 1760 to 1820.
The loose piece of paper was tucked inside a volume about the Palaces of Hanover in Germany.
The diagram of a building was drawn in ink over a pencil outline "in a rather savage way", according to experts.
Peter Barber, head of map collections at the British Library, said the drawing, scribbled on the back of an order of service from St George's Chapel in Windsor, was "not an ordered plan".
It looks like someone was working out some ideas; if this is what madness looks like, oh well.

We have to remember that this was drawn with a crude implement, dipped in ink, and probably not in the best of light. It could have been a sketch to work out some ideas or it could have been the work of someone trying to amuse themselves. It could also have not been drawn by George III at all and it could have been done by a servant or someone at his direction.

Alpine Chair Lift Cable Station


Instead of a castle or a goat or someone on a snowboard, I spotted this through the zoom feature on the camera. This is not easy to spot from the ground, but I zoomed in to the maximum setting I have on my Nikon camera and shot this. I wonder how windy and cold it gets in the deepest part of January up there.

I keep wanting to call this Ice Station Zebra, but what they do here is, they run the chair lift system from one side, and do some sort of communications thing on the other.