Sketch

Cavalry From Above


One of the stylistic themes that I want to have run through The Chasseurs is the overall confusion and chaos of war, and, in particular, of the battlefields where they travel. I envision a number of random shots of cavalry troops, from any and all of the different sides, blinding running around, trampling things, and accomplishing nothing.

The two sketches above are roughly drawn to show the mounted cavalry from overhead, traveling two abreast, and running through the various scenes. They appear, and disappear, within moments. They are important, and cannot be bothered to stop and see what's what.

I tried to do some research on how to adequately draw this, but I ran into a number of roadblocks. Here, you see the riders with the round, flat hats:


What's missing is a drawing guide. I found these after I did the two sketches above:



And, they're helpful, but not as much as an overhead photo would be. I'm not getting the details correct.

Anyway, I like that as a theme, and I'll drop that in when I can.

Character Development Sketches





I have four baseline sketches for the four main dog characters--Ecarlet, Bretagne, Brom and Belge. These are the four breeds I chose last year, and, so far, I haven't seen anything that would convince me to make a change. These four breeds of dog were present during the Napoleonic Wars.

Future sketches will give them a little more of a three-dimensional look, and maybe be a little more "cartoony" or "animation-y." Or they'll just be amateurish. I'm hoping for acceptable.

Storyboard Development for The Chasseurs


Time to start storyboards and story detail.

The opening shot will be on the character Ecarlet (the red poodle). He is the eldest of the four dogs and serves as their leader.

Their life before Waterloo is based on being in that "post-war" mode where everything is wrecked, but just beginning to return to some sort of normalcy. They are scouring the countryside, practicing how they will look for and identify the wounded (which was their job in the French Army, until the Battle of Nations at Leipzig).

At a distance, the French countryside should appear lush and beautiful, but, up close, ruined and ravaged and abandoned and destitute.