Fame

Meg Ryan

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The New York Times magazine has an incredible and detailed piece about Meg Ryan, and where she is at today.

From the late ’80s through the ’90s, Meg Ryan shone about as brightly as any star in Hollywood. You know about her beloved string of romantic comedies — often written by Nora Ephron, often co-starring Tom Hanks. Less well remembered are her dramatic turns in the same era’s “When a Man Loves a Woman,” “City of Angels” and “Courage Under Fire,” all of which were commercial successes. But the harsh reaction to her 2003 erotic thriller, “In the Cut,” a critical and box-office flop that was widely seen as a failed attempt to complicate her winsome image, as well as her growing frustration with fame, compelled her to step into a less public, far happier life. “I wasn’t as curious about acting as I was about other things that life can give you,” says Ryan, 57. She quietly made her directorial debut in 2015 with the World War II-era drama “Ithaca,” and last November, she became engaged to the musician John Mellencamp. “I wanted,” she says, “to live more.”

Actors often talk about how their roles let them explore feelings that they might not otherwise explore. In the time since you began acting less, have you had to adjust how you process emotions? I felt in a crazy way that, as an actor, I was burning through life experiences. Somehow I was a helicopter pilot or a journalist or an alcoholic. I was living these express-lane lives. I’m not answering your question.

Did you feel as if you hit a wall by burning through all those experiences? Or the blunter way of asking the question is: Where’d you go? My son, Jack, graduated from high school on a Friday or Saturday. I moved back to New York from Los Angeles on the following Monday. I was burned out. I didn’t feel like I knew enough anymore about myself or the world to reflect it as an actor. I felt isolated.

In Hollywood or in fame? In fame and in work. Ever get in a car — maybe it’s a superexpensive car — and the inside’s lovely, you can’t complain about it, but you can’t hear anything outside, because there’s so much metal? There’s so much between you and everything else. You’re at a disadvantage as a young, famous person because you don’t know who’s telling you the truth. I’m not complaining — there are so many advantages to being famous — but there are fundamental disadvantages for a part of your brain, your self, your soul. My experiences were too limited.

An amazing talent. What more can you say about her? How many people ever get to a point in their lives where they are ready to tell you everything is bullshit and you need to grab a hold of something real?

Officer, I'd Like to Report a Murder

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So, Richard Marx basically killed Piers Morgan again today.

The problem is, there is virtually nothing left of Morgan because he has been obliterated, again and again, by people on Twitter. This is the guy who shouldn't even have a Twitter account anymore because he has been humiliated so many times on the platform, no one has any credible way of keeping statistics on it. He has, literally, been vaporized on a social media platform and reduced to a quivering heap of ashes and grease stains that have been driven into a cheap piece of carpeting, and walked on by millions and millions of indifferent souls. He has been turned into a barely-remembered afterthought by the collective efforts of those who have taken his ridiculous statements and turned them into withering insults that would have driven any decent person to eschew commenting in public altogether forever. He is without shame or anything resembling a public profile now, and when the sun hits him in a public place, he casts no shadow whatever because sunlight cannot fall on him because he has, for all intents and purposes, been rendered invisible to all good people.

He is Piers Morgan, and he is the consistency of a dissipated wet fart that dried out years ago.

Everyone Knows Ronan Farrow is Frank Sinatra's Son


If Mia Farrow, who is certifiably nuts, were to ever admit that Ronan Farrow is the biological son of Frank Sinatra, she would lose her moral authority as the aggrieved party in the whole Woody Allen mess. Everyone knows this.

The rule of thumb is, you stay away from these people as far as you can; if you're an actor with a certain amount of vanity, you're allowed to go do your one Woody film so that you can have credibility. The rest of them, ugh. Nothing is worse than a blog post that mentions these people, not even a story about some jackasses who drowned a dog because they were doing donuts on the ice.

This is How You End up Broke


Jack Johnson of the Columbus Blue Jackets let his parents "manage" his affairs. Here's what they did to him:
Miller was the first lender, extending a $1.56 million loan on March 9, 2011, that Johnson’s parents used to buy the home in Manhattan Beach, a third of a mile from their son’s residence, while he played for the Kings.
Johnson, a source said, believed that his parents took out a mortgage using money left to them in the will of a relative who had recently died.
The loan — which carried a 12 percent interest rate, almost three times the market rate — quickly went into default because it called for an initial payment of more than $1 million. (The contract extension Johnson signed with the Kings didn’t kick in until the following season, and he didn’t have that much in the bank.)
One day after the home loan was signed, on March 10, 2011, the Johnsons borrowed $2 million at an interest rate of 12 percent from a software developer in Iowa named Rodney L. Blum, who this month won a seat in the U.S. House.
Blum’s office did not respond to interview requests left with Blum’s spokesman by The Dispatch. It’s unclear how Johnson’s family came to know him or why he was making a personal loan at a high interest rate.
Barely a month later, on April 14, 2011, the Johnsons borrowed $3 million — at 24 percent — from Pro Player Funding in upstate New York, a company that “monetized” several NFL players’ contracts during a work stoppage. Former NFL stars Vince Young, who went bankrupt, and Bryant McKinnie, who was sued for default, were among the company’s clients.
Johnson was sued by both Blum and Pro Player Funding within a month of the loans being signed. He signed settlements, according to court documents, without appearing in court to contest the lawsuits.
To settle Blum’s suit, Johnson had $41,800 — or 25 percent — garnisheed from his bimonthly Blue Jackets paychecks over much of the past two seasons.
The next two years brought additional loans and additional defaults, sources said, but the next loan that ended up in the court system was extended on Sept. 13, 2013: a $400,000 loan at 18 percent from EOT Advisors in Tarrant County, Texas.
They essentially used Johnson's future earnings as collateral and "monetized" his contract, which has bankrupted him. When you're borrowing money at an interest rate of 24%, you've essentially entered a financial zone reserved for Rent-a-Center customers and payday lenders. They could have each taken a million dollars and that would have left Johnson solvent and in great shape. Instead, they used a series of loan schemes to take everything this kid had, and then some.

In other words, a professional hockey player who signed a contract worth $30 million dollars in 2011 has about $50 grand in the bank, if that.

Johnson has severed himself from his family, by the way, and has no idea if his 16 year-old brother is being taken care of by his parents. Now that the gravy train has stopped, hopefully they've been able to get jobs and start paying back their son.

Yeah, right.