Rules

Bad Management and Jim Boeheim


Nobody is calling Jim Boeheim a crook or anything like that. He's a terrible manager of people in terms of maintaining ethical standards in an academic environment. He has operated like an absentee landlord, according to the NCAA, and at the level of big time college basketball, that's almost like being a crook, but not really.

Boeheim has plausible deniability--everyone who did things that were unethical in order to provide him the players that he needed to win did so under his relaxed management style. This means that he can threaten an appeal and stay where he's at and accountability will fall on others. That's a great scam if you can pull it off.

Deflated Balls in New England


Oh, come on:
WTHR's Bob Kravitz is reporting the NFL is investigating whether the New England Patriots illegally deflated footballs during the team's AFC Championship game against the Colts Sunday night.
Enough about the sanctity of the sport. If the NFL can't run a game where the game balls are under some sort of fair and neutral control, of course the home team is going to deflate the balls and get some sort of advantage.

There Are No Clocks in Baseball


Baseball, being a perfectly good game the way that it is already played, is played without a clock.

Yes, an umpire can urge the pace along in a game. An umpire can call bullshit on just about anything that looks like a delaying tactic or an attempt to buy some time. But the important thing to remember is that there is no clock.

Baseball is not sacrosanct nor is it precious. The game has changed over time and it will change. But there is still no clock.
A 20-second pitch clock will be used in Double-A and Triple-A games in 2015, reports Fox Sports' Ken Rosenthal and Jon Morosi.
Major League Baseball owners are seeking changes with the players union concerning the pace of play during games, according to the report. But the majors will not use pitch clock this season.

Eventually, a pitch clock could be used by the majors as well, according to the report.

The owners could approve pace of play measures during meetings on Thursday, but nothing would be implemented until the players union signs off on it.
This attempt to speed up the game is just greed speaking through an effort to get people to watch the game and get excited. Someone somewhere is mad that they're not making more money because a game takes too long to play. So it's designed to get people to accelerate the thing--which is the game and how it is played--that was never designed to please owners, advertisers, businessmen or fools in the first place.

There's no goddamned clock in the game and now you think you can make money putting one in now?

Nope.

There is a strategy behind delaying the pace of the game. When a $125 million dollar pitcher blows out his arm struggling to keep pace with the pitch clock, then come and talk to me about the inherent wisdom of speeding up a game that never had a clock in it, ever.