Justice

The Man Who Took All of the Striped Bass

 
Here's what you need to know about striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay and why you haven't seen any for years:
A Maryland fisherman has been sentenced to a year and a half in prison for his role in the illegal harvesting nearly 200,000 pounds of striped bass.

Prosecutors say Michael D. Hayden of Tilghman Island, Maryland, was sentenced Friday in federal court in Baltimore. Prosecutors say U.S. District Judge Richard Bennett sentenced him to spend six months on home detention after he completes his prison sentence. Hayden has been ordered to pay nearly $500,000 in restitution to the state as well as a $40,000 fine.

Hayden acknowledged as part of a plea deal that from at least 2007 to 2011 he and co-conspirators illegally harvested 185,925 pounds of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. 
Now we know the real reason, right? This is from 2012:
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources says the number of young striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay has hit a record low. Even so, scientists say fishermen and diners need not worry, for now at least.

Since 1954, scientists like Erik Durell have been swiping nets through the Chesapeake Bay and counting baby Rockfish. On average, he'll get about 12 tiny fish per sample. This year, the average is less than one — 0.9, in fact.

"It's been a very poor year for striped bass reproduction," says Durell.

The reason is that it's also been a very dry year. Striped Bass or, as rockfish as diners might know them, swim in from the ocean and far upstream to spawn, kind of like salmon. The trouble is, if the flow in rivers and creeks is too slow because of a lack of rain, the eggs don't get carried down to where they need to go. Instead, they fall to the bottom and die in the mud.

There is good news, though.

"These fish are long lived and return to spawn again and again, and that sort of overcomes the unfortunate years when things don't work out," says Durell.

Last year for example, the number of young was up almost 300 percent. Durell says it should even out as long as people don't get in the way.
 
From now on, I think it would be safe to say that the answer could be, "some asshole is taking all the fish."

South American Kidnappers and Major League Baseball

This is sad:

The mother of former major league pitcher Victor Zambrano was kidnapped Sunday, Zambrano's agent Peter Greenberg said late Sunday night by phone. Elizabeth Mendez Zambrano was abducted sometime Sunday morning from her son's farm, about half hour from the central Venezuela city of Maracay, Greenberg said. Venezuela has been haunted in recent years by the kidnapping of rich and famous people. Yorvit Torrealba Jr., the son of Rockies catcher Yorvit Torrealba, and his uncle were kidnapped this summer. They were left unharmed on a road a couple days later. Torrealba has since moved his family to Hollywood, Fla. Former Angels infielder Gus Polidor was killed in April, 1995 while trying to prevent the kidnapping of his infant son via a carjacking. Zambrano played seven years for Tampa Bay, the New York Mets, Toronto and Baltimore. His last game in the big leagues was Sept. 30, 2007.
The attraction is, of course, money, and big league players have certainly been flush with cash. While a player like Zambrano may not have played under a lucrative contract in recent years, there is a perception that anyone who has played in the big leagues has money, and in South America, that means the threat of kidnapping. Throughout Latin America, kidnapping is used to extort money from the rich, or from people perceived to be rich. Here's an older article about the situation, but I think it is indicative of how the crime has perpetrated itself throughout the world, not just Latin America:
Kidnapping is defined as "to hold or carry off, usually for ransom", and encompasses a wide variety of crimes. Economic kidnapping – or the kidnapping business – is where a financial demand is made, which could be either hard cash, or some other financial resource. Political kidnapping, on the other hand, is where political concessions, such as the release of prisoners, changes to the law and policy retreats, are demanded. This distinction may seem straightforward, but in reality cases are rarely this clear cut. There are often grey areas between political and economic kidnapping. For example, the FARC in Colombia is a Marxist-Leninist guerrilla group, but kidnaps for money and is thought to earn hundreds of millions of dollars from it each year. Criminals with political aspirations have also been known to diversify. Definitions are often regarded as the preserve of hair-splitting academics, removed from the reality on the ground. But effective policies and practices for tackling kidnapping are not possible unless they respond to the motivations for the crime and take account of the way kidnappers will react to pressure. For this reason, it is vital that kidnapping cases are defined in terms of the immediate demand rather than any higher order political, religious or other goals a group may have. Economic kidnapping is one of the fastest-growing industries in the world. It is estimated that kidnappers globally take home in the region of $500 million each year in ransom payments: the hostage is a commodity with a price on his head. Reliable statistics are hard to come by, but it is estimated that there are approximately 10,000 kidnappings each year worldwide. The undisputed kidnap capital of the world is Colombia, where the activity has been described as 'a cottage industry'. In 2000, the Colombian National Police recorded 3162 cases. Colombia's problem has not been contained within its own borders. Colombian kidnapping groups often cross over into Venezuela and Ecuador to take hostages, and both countries feature in the top ten. Other hot-spots around the globe include Mexico, where the problem has risen dramatically in the last five years, Brazil, the Philippines and the former Soviet Union. The following table shows the top ten hot-spots in 1999.
Global Kidnapping hot-spots – 1999 1 Colombia 2 Mexico 3 Brazil 4 Philippines 5 Venezuela 6 Ecuador 7 Former Soviet Union 8 Nigeria 9 India 10 South Africa
As the table above shows, Latin America is an important hub for kidnapping. However, it would be wrong to see the crime as a uniquely Latin American problem. Over the past decade or so, kidnapping has risen in parts of Africa, most notably Nigeria and South Africa. This can largely be traced to the expansion of multi-national companies into these countries following the rich natural resources on offer. Similarly, companies moved into parts of the Former Soviet Union following the collapse of communism at the start of the last decade, and the kidnapping rate has grown there, too.
How sad is it that, ten years later, this sort of thing is still prevalent, even in Venezuela? Let's hope that Zambrano is able to get his mother back safe and sound.

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