Education

Michigan State Has an Endowment of $3 Billion

MSU.jpg

When your school protects a monster for decades, of course it's going to hurt your bottom line:

Moody's is weighing whether to downgrade the debt of Michigan State University because of the scandal involving disgraced USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar.

A rating downgrade could mean the school would have to pay more to borrow money. 

Nassar was a member of the MSU faculty. He pleaded guilty to charges he sexually abused his patients and was sentenced last week to 175 years in prison. 

Michigan State faces lawsuits by more than 100 women, alleging that the university allowed Nassar's abuse to persist despite victims' complaints. The suits are one of the major factors prompting the Moody's review. The school is seeking to have those lawsuits dismissed. Lou Anna Simon resigned as school president last week.

I love how no one focuses on how the victims have been impacted. Hundreds of women are victims of a serial molester and someone is worried that the interest rate on money borrowed by a land grant university is going to be too high?

Nassar was hired by Michigan State in 1986. He began molesting children in 1992. That's how long this has been going on. But, damn, let's fret over the costs of taking out a loan.

Michigan State has an endowment of $3 billion dollars, and so I really don't feel sorry for them. Start settling now because lawyers are in short supply, what with everyone who has ever met with Trump needing one right now.

Everyone knows Michigan State is going to pass the savings on to those who pay tuition. They're not touching their endowment. They're not going to do the right thing. They're going to increase tuition, cut services, and hire as many lawyers as they can.

Do-Rags Inhibit Student Athlete Achievement

I mean, look at what a dismal failure this man was at Maryland:

Maryland's lackluster performance under Edsall created rumblings among many of the alumni and boosters who are being counted on to help fund a new indoor football facility that will cost a projected $155 million to build.

After becoming the 34th coach in Maryland football history, Edsall immediately instituted a strict regimen of rules at the school -- including the banning of ball caps, do-rags and earrings in the football house. He also ordered that names be removed from the back of game-day jerseys.

He backed off after a difficult first season in which Maryland lost its final eight games and went 1-7 in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Although the Terrapins have struggled on the field under Edsall, their performance in the classroom improved dramatically. The football program's Athletic Progress Rate reached an all-time high in 2013-14, and 21 players earned a place on the All-Big Ten Academic Team last year.

He got rid of do-rags! But wait--not everyone who ever wore a do-rag was a thug or a poor academic achiever. That's why I have a photo of David Foster Wallace ready at all times.

Edsall was not a failure if you consider that Maryland's move to the Big Ten was ridiculous and ill-considered. That wasn't his fault--he was crushed by changes that had nothing to do with football per se and everything to do with unrealistic expectations for a school that has no business playing regular season games against Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa or Illinois.

Yes, you can make a joke about the do-rags. But he also improved the overall academic achievement in his program as well as had 21 guys end up on the All-Big Ten Academic Team. Of course you have to fire a guy like that.

Deion Sanders and Prime Prep Academy


Deadspin reminds us that Deion Sanders is still a self-licking ice cream cone:
In only the last few months, that school, called, appropriately, Prime Prep Academy, has endured one series of embarrassments after another. Sanders has been fired as head football coach not once but twice. He's been accused of choking two fellow employees. Students havewalked out in protest in the middle of class. Hundreds of laptops have disappeared overnight, most likely stolen. His elementary school—Prime Prep is K-12—was recently named by non-profit Children at Risk as the worst academic institution in North Texas, finishing dead last in a ranking of more than 1,000 schools. And not long ago, the local press got hold of a secretly recorded audio tape in which Sanders could be heard telling his administrators that he not only wanted a significant pay raise, but a new job title, too: "HNIC," short for "Head N*gger in Charge."
Yeah, that's the way to run a school.