Coaching

Bob Knight is Crazy

Thousands and thousands of words have been written about Bob Knight. What nobody seems to understand is that he's crazy:

With Knight, the ironies and contradictions always wreathed around each other. The same man who demanded discipline from his players, showing so little impulse control himself. The figure who demanded unwavering loyalty from those around him, quick to excommunicate friends from his inner circle and turn on allies (read: Mike Krzyzewski, among many others). The coach who sometimes spoke in the most profane terms imaginable, prudishly forbidding the Assembly Hall crowd from chanting BULL-SHIT. The teacher who stressed attention to detail, going about his own business with active disdain for nuance.

Really, if you reduce every anecdote, every public statement, everything Knight has ever done down to one thing, it all makes sense. He's a out-of-control lunatic. How is he even allowed to own a gun or drive a car? I've never understood this.

Don't Get Caught Stealing Signs

 

This old saw again?

 

 

The Philadelphia Phillies have won back-to-back NL pennants and were World Champions in 2008.
They have a talented roster, but is there more to their success than talent?
Major League Baseball issued a warning to the Phillies on Tuesday concerning accusations that bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer was stealing signs during Monday night’s game against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field.
"We have looked at the video and talked to the Phillies about the actions of their bullpen coach,’’ a Major League Baseball official told FOXSports.com.

 


Stealing signs is as old as the game itself. You're not supposed to get caught. That's pretty much the entirety of this issue. Yes, it happens. No, you're not supposed to do it. When you get caught, ouch.

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Bailing on Tiger



Hank HaneyI hope that this is innocent and all--I don't relish the idea of Tiger Woods presiding over the fiasco of a career and a personal life. To me, the man needs to stop thinking he can get away with things because of the possibility that a lot of what he does will be excused because he's a "kid." Tiger Woods is not a kid, and now he's a golfer without a swing coach:
Tiger Woods’ longtime swing coach resigned Monday night, leaving the world’s No. 1 player without one of his top advisers as he tries to rebuild his game.
Hank Haney said in a statement to the Golf Channel that he enjoyed working with Woods but he thinks it’s time for him to step aside as his coach.
“I will always look back upon our past half-dozen years together as my best days in professional golf,” he said. “It would be a dream of any coach to have a student like Tiger Woods and for me it has come true. Just so there is no confusion I would like to make it clear that this is my decision."
Well, the speculation was correct, and Hank Haney probably doesn't have to worry about picking up clients. In fact, Hank has a pretty good deal going for himself. Here's what Hank put on his website last night:
I have informed Tiger Woods this evening that I will no longer be his coach.
I would like to thank Tiger for the opportunity that I have had to work with him over the past 6 plus years. Tiger Woods has done the work to achieve a level of greatness that I believe the game of golf has never seen before and I will always appreciate the opportunity that I have had to contribute to his successes. I have also enjoyed the association that I have had with Tiger both on and off the golfcourse as I have had some incredible experiences. 
But, what people who know golf can tell you, is that coaching is important, but mental preparedness is more important. Tiger can be the best-coached golfer in the world and still unravel like a cheap sweater when his head gets in the way. I really think there are physical issues here, and perhaps my speculation about pain killers was not as wildly off the mark as it could have been.
 
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Will Pete Carroll Go Back to the NFL?


Add me to the list of people who think this is a bad idea, if there is such a list:


Carroll's NFL experience was a lifetime ago; ten years is a long time to be out of the day to day grind. As good as USC has been, and as good as the competition has been, that's still not the NFL and no one can convince me otherwise.

Is Seattle the right organization? It's not a terrible organization, not by a long shot. It's not Oakland, and it's not Kansas City and it's certainly not the Washington Redskins (which snapped up a man in Mike Shanahan who's only been out of a job for a few years, rather than an entire decade plus one season).

I picked up the photo from a blog called "Kornheiser's Cartel," which promised to be a sports blog angling to trade off a little of the Mr. Tony magic (without actually involving him, of course).

Alas, that blog has been dead in the water for months. It sputtered through March, going a week or better with no updates, and then died in April, just as baseball season was getting underway. Someone took the time to design the blog, and register "kornheiserscartel.com" and everything. And it died from neglect.

A coach's command of the NFL dies from neglect as well. Could Carroll get it back? Could Carroll succeed? Absolutely. But, the price of failure might leave him unable to walk away from the NFL and go back to a plum job like USC. As long as the program he has built is succeeding, why would he walk away? Carroll could take the Seattle job and make a splash. That's when I'm afraid the game, and the competitive nature of the league, plus the parity in talent, would begin to take a toll on Carroll's bag of tricks. All coaches die a slow, lingering death in the NFL--just ask Bill Belichick, the guy who replaced Carroll.

The Los Angeles Times reported Friday that Seahawks chief executive officer Tod Leiweke flew to California this week to interview Carroll for the job. ESPN.com, citing unidentified league sources, said an announcement of Carroll joining the Seahawks could come early next week.

"Pete's name comes out at this time every year. In the past, he hasn't commented on such reports," USC spokesman Tim Tessalone said in an e-mail to The Associated Press. "He was not expected in [Friday]. ... At this point, we have nothing to report."

A Seahawks spokesman inside the team's headquarters Friday refused to comment on Carroll. Carroll did not return a phone message left by The AP.

Leiweke did not respond to an e-mail from The AP asking about Carroll, who was 6-10 in 1994 with the New York Jets and then 27-21 while twice reaching the playoffs from '97-99 with the New England Patriots.

University of Washington coach Steve Sarkisian, who left his friend Carroll and the Trojans 12 months ago for his first head coaching job, chuckled when asked if he'd like to be a head coach in the same city as his mentor.

"That'd be kind of fun," Sarkisian said.

"I'm so used to hearing people talk about Pete Carroll going to the NFL, they've been saying it for the last seven years when I was with him, so it's not new to me," Sarkisian said. "It doesn't surprise me at all. Every year. You can't find a year in the last seven years where it hasn't been brought up."

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