A Lost Battalion Awaits a Proper Burial

8th US Cavalry Regiment CrestSomewhere on the Korean peninsula, there are the remains of countless American soldiers who have fallen in battle but were left behind, thousands of them. They await a proper burial:



Trapped by two Chinese divisions, troops of the 8th U.S. Cavalry Regiment were left to die in far northern Korea, abandoned by the U.S. command in a Korean War episode viewed as one of the most troubling in American military history.


Sixty years later those fallen soldiers, the lost battalion of Unsan, are stranded anew.


North Korea is offering fresh clues to their remains. American teams are ready to re-enter the north to dig for them. But for five years the U.S. government has refused to work with North Korea to recover the men of Unsan and others among more than 8,000 U.S. missing in action from the 1950-53 war.


Now, under pressure from MIA family groups, the Obama administration is said to be moving slowly to reverse the Bush administration's suspension of the joint recovery program, a step taken in 2005 as the North Korean nuclear crisis dragged on.


"If I had a direct line in to the president, I would say, 'Please reinstitute this program. There are families that need closure,'" said Ruth Davis, 61, of Palestine, Texas, whose uncle, Sgt. 1st Class Benny Don Rogers, has been listed as MIA since Chinese attackers overran his company — I Company, 8th Cavalry — at Unsan in late 1950.



It would be fitting to give the families closure and to give these men a marker of their own.